China-Tanzania joint malaria project: application of...

In the News

Study establishes link between gender, extramarital affairs and HIV

Dar es Salaam. A new Ifakara Health Institute study has found “a significant association between lifetime (proxy) extramarital affairs and HIV infection among women only,” with the risk being significantly …

IHI names winners of research, innovation fund

[Right-Left] Getrud, Beatrice, Theckla, and Tutu.Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) has named recipients of the 2017/18 Director’s Research and Innovation Fund. This is an internal funding mechanism aimed to support specific …

Recent Projects

Development of a new tool for malaria mosquito surveillance to improve vector control

Malaria transmission is influenced not only by vector abundance, but as well by demographic traits such as vector species and age structure, as these influence the intensity by which the …

Demonstrating complete disruption of residual malaria transmission by eliminating Anopheles funestus mosquitoes from rural Tanzanian villages

In rural south-eastern Tanzania, where malaria prevalence has reduced by >60% since 2000, low-to-moderate transmission still persists despite very high coverage with long-lasting insecticidal bednets. Like in most residual transmission …

China-Tanzania joint pilot project on malaria control: application of community-based and integrated strategy to reduce malaria burden in rural Tanzania

This project implements the WHO recommended T3 strategy (Test, Treat and Track) integrating it with the Chinese experience to optimize the impact of existing malaria control interventions (Chemotherapy, LLINs, IRS,BCC and Larviciding). The project aims to reduce the morbidity and mortality of malaria burden in pilot areas, as well as to strengthen the capacity of the local communities for malaria control. The project is being piloted in two study populations with two controls (Wards-catchment populations) in Rufiji district. One of the sites represents a high malaria burden community with over 20% incidence, while the other a low malaria incidence community with less than 5% incidence.

The project implements the T3-strategy of World Health Organization through community case management integrated with Chinese malaria control experience while exploring for an appropriate strategy and model that is best tailored to our local settings. Through joint weekly review of the routine health facility data, the project identifies and targets the hotspots of ongoing malaria transmission through mass screening and treatment (MSAT). Through this interaction, the project envisages that the efficiency of malaria control activities will be improved in terms of parasitological examination rate, standardized treatment rate and case reporting rate. Consequently, the malaria disease burden will be decreased by 30% in the study communities in comparison with that in the beginning of the project.

Lead Scientists:

Salim Abdulla

Prosper Chaki

Yeromin Mlacha

Rashid Khatib

Partners

Ministry of Health Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children (MoHCDGEC) Tanzania
National Institute of Parasitic Diseases (NIPD), China

Funders

Department for International Development (DFID)

Projects Location

A PIXELBASE DESIGN
© Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), 2016