Control of malaria vectors by the...

In the News

How healthy is city life in Tanzania?: Ifakara scientists reveal surprising results

How healthy is city life in Tanzania? By Gemma Todd At Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), we recognise the changing burden of disease and its geography. A team of researchers at …

Tanzanian institute develops new technology to fight malaria

As the world and Africa, in particular, continues to grapple with malaria, Tanzania’s Ifakara Health Institute has developed a new technology that has proven quite effective in fighting malaria. According to the …

Recent Projects

Assessing the progress towards rabies elimination from Pemba Island, Tanzania

Rabies is a deadly disease endemic in dog populations across Africa. Although rabies can be eliminated through mass dog vaccination, there has been little investment in dog vaccination in Africa …

Engaging pastoralists in controlling malaria mosquitoes in their communities

The project is aimed at applying pastoralists’ knowledge to find water bodies during the dry season and accurately identify aquatic habitats that can be treated with larvicide pyriproxyfen (PPF) to …

Control of malaria vectors by the auto-dissemination of insecticides

Long lasting Insecticide treated nets (LLINs) and Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) have contributed significantly to reduction of malaria burden over the past decade. However, for elimination of this disease, complementary vector control tools are continuously needed to speed up this process. We believe that mosquitoes themselves could be used to pick up small doses of insecticides and transfer these to their own breeding habitats, and this way, we can stop further proliferation of mosquito populations. This process is called Auto-dissemination. The main goal of the project is to demonstrate utility of auto-dissemination of insecticides for reducing abundance of malaria vectors. The experiments are conducted inside semi-field systems (SFS), designed to mimic natural mosquito ecosystems. The candidate insecticide is Pyriproxyfen (PPF), a juvenile hormone analogue that inhibits normal growth in mosquito life stages, but also sterilizes adult mosquitoes. If delivered effectively to the malaria vectors breeding habitats, most mature juvenile mosquito stages will not become adults, and thus the density of mosquitoes will be reduced, consequently reducing malaria transmission. Our model mosquito is Anopheles arabiensis, a common vector in many residual malaria transmission settings in Africa.

Lead Scientists:

Fredros Okumu

Dickson Wilson Lwetoijera

Samson Kiware

Mercy Opiyo

 

Partners

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Funders

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Projects Location

A PIXELBASE DESIGN
© Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), 2016