Control of malaria vectors by the...

In the News

IHI at the first Malaria World Congress in Melbourne

(Melbourne) Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) was represented by three scientists to the inaugural Malaria World Congress in Melbourne, Australia. Research scientists, Dr. Gerry Killeen and Nancy Matowo took to the …

IHI researcher Nancy on Australian radio SBS

(Melbourne) Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) Research Scientist Nancy Matowo recently was invited to a 26-minute radio interview with the SBS, a Swahili Australian radio, to share her research work and …

Recent Projects

Sustainable, Healthy, Learning Cities and Neighbourhoods

The Sustainable, Healthy, Learning Cities and Neighbourhoods is an exciting project in which IHI works with a consortium of partners from Asia and Africa to 1) develop capacity for improved …

Development of a new tool for malaria mosquito surveillance to improve vector control

Malaria transmission is influenced not only by vector abundance, but as well by demographic traits such as vector species and age structure, as these influence the intensity by which the …

Control of malaria vectors by the auto-dissemination of insecticides

Long lasting Insecticide treated nets (LLINs) and Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) have contributed significantly to reduction of malaria burden over the past decade. However, for elimination of this disease, complementary vector control tools are continuously needed to speed up this process. We believe that mosquitoes themselves could be used to pick up small doses of insecticides and transfer these to their own breeding habitats, and this way, we can stop further proliferation of mosquito populations. This process is called Auto-dissemination. The main goal of the project is to demonstrate utility of auto-dissemination of insecticides for reducing abundance of malaria vectors. The experiments are conducted inside semi-field systems (SFS), designed to mimic natural mosquito ecosystems. The candidate insecticide is Pyriproxyfen (PPF), a juvenile hormone analogue that inhibits normal growth in mosquito life stages, but also sterilizes adult mosquitoes. If delivered effectively to the malaria vectors breeding habitats, most mature juvenile mosquito stages will not become adults, and thus the density of mosquitoes will be reduced, consequently reducing malaria transmission. Our model mosquito is Anopheles arabiensis, a common vector in many residual malaria transmission settings in Africa.

Lead Scientists:

Fredros Okumu

Dickson Wilson Lwetoijera

Samson Kiware

Mercy Opiyo

 

Partners

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Funders

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Projects Location

A PIXELBASE DESIGN
© Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), 2016