Control of malaria vectors by the...

In the News

Scientists: Target TB interventions on these transmission hotspots

(Dar es Salaam, September 14, 2017). Scientists at Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) have recently adapted a method for identifying tuberculosis (TB) transmission hotpots using a new technique that could revolutionize …

Research Office, Lab Technicians required

IHI is looking for suitably qualified Research Officer and Laboratory Technicians to fill vacant positions in the Laboratory Unit in Bagamoyo. To apply or share, get more details about these …

Recent Projects

Understanding and enhancing approaches to quality improvement in small and medium sized private facilities in sub-Saharan Africa

This is an evaluation study that IHI is conducting in collaboration with London school of hygiene and tropical medicine. The research takes place in the context of an innovative intervention …

Vaccine Delivery Costing Study

As countries drive towards achieving high and equitable coverage of life-saving vaccines, the availability of sustainable, equitable, and predictable financing for vaccine delivery is essential. Over the last two decades, …

Control of malaria vectors by the auto-dissemination of insecticides

Long lasting Insecticide treated nets (LLINs) and Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) have contributed significantly to reduction of malaria burden over the past decade. However, for elimination of this disease, complementary vector control tools are continuously needed to speed up this process. We believe that mosquitoes themselves could be used to pick up small doses of insecticides and transfer these to their own breeding habitats, and this way, we can stop further proliferation of mosquito populations. This process is called Auto-dissemination. The main goal of the project is to demonstrate utility of auto-dissemination of insecticides for reducing abundance of malaria vectors. The experiments are conducted inside semi-field systems (SFS), designed to mimic natural mosquito ecosystems. The candidate insecticide is Pyriproxyfen (PPF), a juvenile hormone analogue that inhibits normal growth in mosquito life stages, but also sterilizes adult mosquitoes. If delivered effectively to the malaria vectors breeding habitats, most mature juvenile mosquito stages will not become adults, and thus the density of mosquitoes will be reduced, consequently reducing malaria transmission. Our model mosquito is Anopheles arabiensis, a common vector in many residual malaria transmission settings in Africa.

Lead Scientists:

Fredros Okumu

Dickson Wilson Lwetoijera

Samson Kiware

Mercy Opiyo

 

Partners

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Funders

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Projects Location

A PIXELBASE DESIGN
© Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), 2016