Fighting insect-borne diseases and enriching urban...

In the News

Bagamoyo academy pupils briefed on product testing at IHI

(Bagamoyo) The IHI Vector Control Product Testing Unit in Bagamoyo today hosted pupils from Stephen Tito Academy who visited the IHI Kingani site to learn about malaria research. IHI’s Emmanuel …

IHI chief: Hub for innovative minds in the pipeline

(Dar es Salaam) Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) Chief Executive Director Dr. Honorati Masanja has unveiled plans to establish an innovation hub in the Institute’s birthplace – Ifakara. IHI Chief Executive …

Recent Projects

Sustainable, Healthy, Learning Cities and Neighbourhoods

The Sustainable, Healthy, Learning Cities and Neighbourhoods is an exciting project in which IHI works with a consortium of partners from Asia and Africa to 1) develop capacity for improved …

Development of a new tool for malaria mosquito surveillance to improve vector control

Malaria transmission is influenced not only by vector abundance, but as well by demographic traits such as vector species and age structure, as these influence the intensity by which the …

Fighting insect-borne diseases and enriching urban agricultural land by using molasses: a common by-product from sugar factories

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most important olfactory stimuli involved in host finding by mosquitoes as it induces and sustains flights of mosquitoes when intermittently detected. Due to this CO2 is considered to be one of the best baits for luring host-seeking mosquitoes in disease vector surveillance and mosquito control programs. Current sources of CO2 have various limitations; and therefore, there is a need for finding a cheaper source of CO2. The action of yeast on sugar cane blackstrap molasses (hereinafter referred simply as molasses) has been proven to produce ample amounts of CO2that can be used to lure mosquitoes as documented by Mweresa et al 2014. At the same time in the agricultural sector it has already been documented that unfermented molasses diluted in water and mixed with effective microorganisms can be used for enriching the soil with organic nutrients like nitrogen and potassium. The project evaluates the potential of molasses as a low-cost source mosquito attractants for use in surveillance of disease vectors, and whether the fermentation residues can be used as a product for soil enrichment for household gardens.

Lead Scientists:

Kyeba Swai

Emmanuel Kaindoa

Nancy Matowo

Fredros Okumu

Partners

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Funders

Grand Challenges Canada

Projects Location

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© Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), 2016