Targeting residual malaria vectors in areas...

In the News

IHI wins Grand Challenges Explorations grant

Dar es Salaam. Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) is a Grand Challenges Explorations winner, an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.  Ms. Zawadi Mageni, a Research Scientist at …

IHI partners support Ifakara women group

Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) partners at the Innovative Vector Control Consortium (IVCC), Jed Stone and Christopher Larkin, recently distributed 300 conference bags made of cotton from the Ifakara Women’s Weavers …

Recent Projects

Understanding and enhancing approaches to quality improvement in small and medium sized private facilities in sub-Saharan Africa

This is an evaluation study that IHI is conducting in collaboration with London school of hygiene and tropical medicine. The research takes place in the context of an innovative intervention …

Vaccine Delivery Costing Study

As countries drive towards achieving high and equitable coverage of life-saving vaccines, the availability of sustainable, equitable, and predictable financing for vaccine delivery is essential. Over the last two decades, …

Targeting residual malaria vectors in areas where long-lasting insecticide treated nets are already widely used

Common malaria interventions, notably insecticidal bed nets have significantly reduced disease, by tackling important malaria mosquitoes, especially those that bite people indoors and rest indoors. However, malaria still causes nearly 430,000 deaths annually, mostly African children. This persistent malaria is increasingly acquired from mosquitoes that bite people outside dwellings, can survive on blood from other vertebrates like cattle, are not readily controlled by indoor interventions like bed nets, and are not easily detectable by existing traps.

residual-malaria-curve-22

Vector surveillance still relies on dangerous and costly methods involving human volunteers; so first, we should introduce simpler, safer and scalable methods. Second, we still do not adequately understand many of these residual mosquitoes, because existing sampling strategies do not capture their atypical behaviours. Lastly, we need more targeted resource allocation, especially since residual transmission is often unevenly distributed. The aim of this project is to develop a low-cost strategy for monitoring densities and transmission activity of residual vector populations that perpetuate malaria transmission in communities where LLINs are widely used, so as to improve targeting of interventions towards elimination. The work also includes demonstrating effective replacement for human volunteers in mosquito surveillance and developing low-cost strategies for large-scale longitudinal monitoring. The field data is then extrapolated using cutting-age mathematical approaches originally developed by theoretical ecologists, to target residual vectors.

Lead Scientists:

Fredros Okumu

Halfan Ngowo

Partners

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Insitute
University of Glasgow

Funders

Wellcome Trust

Projects Location

A PIXELBASE DESIGN
© Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), 2016