Targeting residual malaria vectors in areas...

In the News

Ifakara forms winning team at Nane Nane show

(Morogoro) Ifakara Health Institute was among institutions which formed ‘the dream team’ that was picked by judges as the second best exhibitor at the Farmers’ Show for eastern zone exhibitors …

Talk by IHI scientist on TED crosses a million views mark

(Dar es Salaam) A talk on the biology of mosquitoes by IHI seasoned researcher Fredros Okumu on TED.com – an international platform holding conferences and posting talks online – has …

Recent Projects

Sustainable, Healthy, Learning Cities and Neighbourhoods

The Sustainable, Healthy, Learning Cities and Neighbourhoods is an exciting project in which IHI works with a consortium of partners from Asia and Africa to 1) develop capacity for improved …

Development of a new tool for malaria mosquito surveillance to improve vector control

Malaria transmission is influenced not only by vector abundance, but as well by demographic traits such as vector species and age structure, as these influence the intensity by which the …

Targeting residual malaria vectors in areas where long-lasting insecticide treated nets are already widely used

Common malaria interventions, notably insecticidal bed nets have significantly reduced disease, by tackling important malaria mosquitoes, especially those that bite people indoors and rest indoors. However, malaria still causes nearly 430,000 deaths annually, mostly African children. This persistent malaria is increasingly acquired from mosquitoes that bite people outside dwellings, can survive on blood from other vertebrates like cattle, are not readily controlled by indoor interventions like bed nets, and are not easily detectable by existing traps.

residual-malaria-curve-22

Vector surveillance still relies on dangerous and costly methods involving human volunteers; so first, we should introduce simpler, safer and scalable methods. Second, we still do not adequately understand many of these residual mosquitoes, because existing sampling strategies do not capture their atypical behaviours. Lastly, we need more targeted resource allocation, especially since residual transmission is often unevenly distributed. The aim of this project is to develop a low-cost strategy for monitoring densities and transmission activity of residual vector populations that perpetuate malaria transmission in communities where LLINs are widely used, so as to improve targeting of interventions towards elimination. The work also includes demonstrating effective replacement for human volunteers in mosquito surveillance and developing low-cost strategies for large-scale longitudinal monitoring. The field data is then extrapolated using cutting-age mathematical approaches originally developed by theoretical ecologists, to target residual vectors.

Lead Scientists:

Fredros Okumu

Halfan Ngowo

Partners

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Insitute
University of Glasgow

Funders

Wellcome Trust

Projects Location

A PIXELBASE DESIGN
© Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), 2016