Homestead agriculture for improving the nutrition...

In the News

IHI names winners of research, innovation fund

[Right-Left] Getrud, Beatrice, Theckla, and Tutu.Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) has named recipients of the 2017/18 Director’s Research and Innovation Fund. This is an internal funding mechanism aimed to support specific …

Study reports boys, girls start working in the mines at 7

(Dar es Salaam, May 8, 2018). New findings of a formative study by Ifaraha Health Institute (IHI) and partners which focused on children in mining show that child miners, both …

Recent Projects

Development of a new tool for malaria mosquito surveillance to improve vector control

Malaria transmission is influenced not only by vector abundance, but as well by demographic traits such as vector species and age structure, as these influence the intensity by which the …

Demonstrating complete disruption of residual malaria transmission by eliminating Anopheles funestus mosquitoes from rural Tanzanian villages

In rural south-eastern Tanzania, where malaria prevalence has reduced by >60% since 2000, low-to-moderate transmission still persists despite very high coverage with long-lasting insecticidal bednets. Like in most residual transmission …

Homestead Agriculture, Nutrition and Health Project in Rufiji District, Tanzania

This is a nutrition-sensitive homestead food production project in Rufiji, Tanzania, dubbed HANU.  The project is conducting an integrated, gender-sensitive, agriculture, nutrition and health intervention with the goal of improving the nutrition and health of children and women in rural Tanzania.

nancy-gardenThe project is addressing child under nutrition by tackling the underlying causes. The Agricultural Extension Workers and Community Health Workers have been trained to guide households on best farming practices for the cultivation of nutrient-rich crop varieties and homestead livestock production. The primary targets of the project are women and children in rural households.

We expect that participation in the intervention would lead to increased home food production, improved diets and nutrition of vulnerable household members, improved health behaviors, and empowerment of women. Long-term impacts could include lower levels of childhood infections and mortality, and higher levels of optimal child development. The project will occur in 5 villages under Rufiji DSS.

 

Lead Scientists:

Honorati Masanja

Partners

University of Glasgow

Funders

Izumi Foundation

Projects Location

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