Vaccine Delivery Costing Study

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[Right-Left] Getrud, Beatrice, Theckla, and Tutu.Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) has named recipients of the 2017/18 Director’s Research and Innovation Fund. This is an internal funding mechanism aimed to support specific …

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As countries drive towards achieving high and equitable coverage of life-saving vaccines, the availability of sustainable, equitable, and predictable financing for vaccine delivery is essential. Over the last two decades, great strides have been made in expanding the coverage of routine and new vaccines, in part through better understanding the cost of delivering immunization services. However, gaps in cost evidence remain, such as the costs associated with different delivery strategies, the cost of scaling up, and the upstream drivers of immunization delivery costs. In addition, the data that do exist are often fragmented, of variable quality, and/or difficult to access and use by policymakers, program planners, and other global and country-level stakeholders. Consequently, historical funding levels, rather than cost evidence, are often used to plan and budget immunization programs.

Immunization delivery costing study aims to increase the visibility, availability, understanding, and use of evidence information on costing/budgeting of delivering immunization services. The IHI as country research partners to ThinkWell Institute, JSI and policymakers aims to build country capacity around generation, interpretation, and use of cost evidence to work towards sustainable and predictable financing for vaccine delivery.

This project focuses on vaccine delivery costs. For the purposes of this project, delivery costs are defined as the component of total immunization program cost, exclusive of vaccine costs. Delivery costs include the costs of vaccine administration (facility-based, outreach, or other delivery strategy), vaccine collection, distribution and storage and disposal, record-keeping and information systems, supervision, surveillance (AEFI and disease surveillance), training, social mobilization, and program management. Delivery costs include the costs of safe injection and waste disposal. Costs are expressed as financial costs (financial outlays) and valued as economic costs (taking into account the opportunity costs of health worker time).

 

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