Control of Zika transmission using low-cost...

In the News

Malaria: Call for action to curb insecticide resistance

Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) scientist Gerry Killeen has called for the international community to be bolder in adopting new products for existing interventions such as insecticide treated bed nets, so …

Muhas don is new IHI board member

Prof. Kaaya. Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) Board of Governors (BOG) has appointed Prof. Sylvia Kaaya member of the IHI Board of Trustees (BOT) effective Wednesday January 10, 2018. The appointment …

Recent Projects

Development of a new tool for malaria mosquito surveillance to improve vector control

Malaria transmission is influenced not only by vector abundance, but as well by demographic traits such as vector species and age structure, as these influence the intensity by which the …

Demonstrating complete disruption of residual malaria transmission by eliminating Anopheles funestus mosquitoes from rural Tanzanian villages

In rural south-eastern Tanzania, where malaria prevalence has reduced by >60% since 2000, low-to-moderate transmission still persists despite very high coverage with long-lasting insecticidal bednets. Like in most residual transmission …

Control of Zika transmission using low-cost transfluthrin repellent emanators

Existing repellent products are designed for middle and high income country markets, where users can afford to replace or retreat them every day, week, or month. However, these are too expensive and impractical for routine use in communities of low-income countries.

sisal-mats-repellentsWe recently developed a low-technology emanatory which releases repellent transfluthrin vapour more slowly, to provide protection against mosquitoes for months or even a year at a time. Thus far however, this device has only been assessed against night-biting vectors of malaria and filariasis. The overall goal of this study is therefore to repeat these assessments of efficacy for the day-biting Aedes aegypti, the most globally important vector of Dengue, Chikungunya and Zika. The project will be implemented in Dar es Salaam, where Aedes aegpti is abundant and has been responsible for Dengue epidemics.

Lead Scientists:

Gerry Killeen

Nicodem J.  Govella

Sheila Ogoma

Partners

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
University of Glasgow

Funders

MRC

Projects Location

A PIXELBASE DESIGN
© Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), 2016