Control of Zika transmission using low-cost...

In the News

Scientists: Target TB interventions on these transmission hotspots

(Dar es Salaam, September 14, 2017). Scientists at Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) have recently adapted a method for identifying tuberculosis (TB) transmission hotpots using a new technique that could revolutionize …

Research Office, Lab Technicians required

IHI is looking for suitably qualified Research Officer and Laboratory Technicians to fill vacant positions in the Laboratory Unit in Bagamoyo. To apply or share, get more details about these …

Recent Projects

Understanding and enhancing approaches to quality improvement in small and medium sized private facilities in sub-Saharan Africa

This is an evaluation study that IHI is conducting in collaboration with London school of hygiene and tropical medicine. The research takes place in the context of an innovative intervention …

Vaccine Delivery Costing Study

As countries drive towards achieving high and equitable coverage of life-saving vaccines, the availability of sustainable, equitable, and predictable financing for vaccine delivery is essential. Over the last two decades, …

Control of Zika transmission using low-cost transfluthrin repellent emanators

Existing repellent products are designed for middle and high income country markets, where users can afford to replace or retreat them every day, week, or month. However, these are too expensive and impractical for routine use in communities of low-income countries.

sisal-mats-repellentsWe recently developed a low-technology emanatory which releases repellent transfluthrin vapour more slowly, to provide protection against mosquitoes for months or even a year at a time. Thus far however, this device has only been assessed against night-biting vectors of malaria and filariasis. The overall goal of this study is therefore to repeat these assessments of efficacy for the day-biting Aedes aegypti, the most globally important vector of Dengue, Chikungunya and Zika. The project will be implemented in Dar es Salaam, where Aedes aegpti is abundant and has been responsible for Dengue epidemics.

Lead Scientists:

Gerry Killeen

Nicodem J.  Govella

Sheila Ogoma

Partners

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
University of Glasgow

Funders

MRC

Projects Location

A PIXELBASE DESIGN
© Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), 2016