Joint statement: Scientists update on residual...

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Study establishes link between gender, extramarital affairs and HIV

Dar es Salaam. A new Ifakara Health Institute study has found “a significant association between lifetime (proxy) extramarital affairs and HIV infection among women only,” with the risk being significantly …

IHI names winners of research, innovation fund

[Right-Left] Getrud, Beatrice, Theckla, and Tutu.Ifakara Health Institute (IHI) has named recipients of the 2017/18 Director’s Research and Innovation Fund. This is an internal funding mechanism aimed to support specific …

Recent Projects

Development of a new tool for malaria mosquito surveillance to improve vector control

Malaria transmission is influenced not only by vector abundance, but as well by demographic traits such as vector species and age structure, as these influence the intensity by which the …

Demonstrating complete disruption of residual malaria transmission by eliminating Anopheles funestus mosquitoes from rural Tanzanian villages

In rural south-eastern Tanzania, where malaria prevalence has reduced by >60% since 2000, low-to-moderate transmission still persists despite very high coverage with long-lasting insecticidal bednets. Like in most residual transmission …

Dar es Salaam, November 29, 2017. The Residual Malaria Transmission workshop enters the second day today. The workshop, which is scheduled to end tomorrow, discusses findings of research projects investigating the magnitude and causes of residual transmission.

IHI scientists – Dr. Honorati Masanja, Dr. Fredros Okumu, and Dr. Sarah Moore – released on the first day of the workshop a joint statement on the situation of residual malaria, which updates on what is being done in Tanzania and discusses resistance and new horizon products, suggesting that behavior change is key to maximizing control.

Read the statement here: IHI scientists joint statement on the situation of residual malaria in Tanzania

IHI hosts the workshop jointly with the World Health Organization (WHO)’s Special Program for Research in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and The Global Malaria Programme (GMP).

The workshop, the first of its kind to be held in Tanzania, brings together researchers, experts, government officials, development partners and civil society organizations from Africa, Asia, Europe and America. #

 

 

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