Sarah Moore

In the News

Mosquito behind 90% of malaria identified

Scientists identify notorious mosquito species behind 90% of malaria in rural Tanzania This is anopheles funestus. Photo: Courtesy of Dr. Joachim Pelican (Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland) …

NM-AIST invites applications into MScPHR

The Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology (NM-AIST) invites applications for admission into the Master of Science in Public Health Research (MScPHR) degree programme for the 2017/18 academic …

Recent Projects

Understanding and enhancing approaches to quality improvement in small and medium sized private facilities in sub-Saharan Africa

This is an evaluation study that IHI is conducting in collaboration with London school of hygiene and tropical medicine. The research takes place in the context of an innovative intervention …

Vaccine Delivery Costing Study

As countries drive towards achieving high and equitable coverage of life-saving vaccines, the availability of sustainable, equitable, and predictable financing for vaccine delivery is essential. Over the last two decades, …

Sarah Moore

Research Scientist

Dr. Sarah Moore is a vector ecologist specializing in the chemical ecology and control of Anopheles mosquitoes with a focus on new and existing methods of repelling mosquitoes to protect individuals, households and communities. This includes repellents, repellent treated clothing and odour baited traps. Since working in Tanzania and witnessing the elegance of bednets as a malaria control tool in this setting, she has branched out into the evaluation of new indoor vector control tools including bednets and insecticides used for indoor spraying with new combinations of active ingredients or longer lasting formulations. As her knowledge of vector control deepened, she has added epidemiological evaluations of vector control tools to her research portfolio. Her work is dedicated to accurately measuring the efficacy of vector control tools using appropriate experimental design and data analysis in an open and collaborative way, and supporting others to build their own capacity to be able to do the same. Dr. Moore is currently leading the Good Laboratory Practice accreditation of the Ifakara Health Institute insecticide testing facility, and she is supervising four PhD students registered at Swiss Tropical and Public Health institute, University of Basel, where she is a group leader. In this way, Dr. Moore hopes to assist the global malaria control community to respond to the ever-shifting vector control environment to achieve malaria eradication in a timely and cost effective manner

View Dr. Moore’s Research Interests and Publications

Projects

Videographic analysis of mosquito behaviours around humans and mosquito traps

Targeting residual malaria vectors in areas where bed nets are already widely used

Evaluation of the Push-Pull strategies for the control of outdoor biting mosquitoes

Movement rates of African malaria vectors and the impact of mosquito control interventions upon them

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Assessing malaria infections among migratory rice farmers in a residual transmission setting in rural south eastern Tanzania

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Evaluation of insecticide-treated military uniforms for malaria prevention and control in regions of hyperendemicity

Measuring the useful life of bed nets for malaria control in Tanzania: attrition, bioefficacy, chemistry, durability and insecticide resistance

How important are holes and insecticide for stopping mosquitoes getting through bed nets

Phase III evaluation of DawaPlus 2.0 bed nets: biological efficacy, fabric integrity, survivorship and community acceptability

Improved IRS: evaluating the neonicotinoid, clothianidin for indoor residual spraying against malaria

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