Kimberly Mihayo

In the News

Mosquito behind 90% of malaria identified

Scientists identify notorious mosquito species behind 90% of malaria in rural Tanzania This is anopheles funestus. Photo: Courtesy of Dr. Joachim Pelican (Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland) …

NM-AIST invites applications into MScPHR

The Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology (NM-AIST) invites applications for admission into the Master of Science in Public Health Research (MScPHR) degree programme for the 2017/18 academic …

Recent Projects

Understanding and enhancing approaches to quality improvement in small and medium sized private facilities in sub-Saharan Africa

This is an evaluation study that IHI is conducting in collaboration with London school of hygiene and tropical medicine. The research takes place in the context of an innovative intervention …

Vaccine Delivery Costing Study

As countries drive towards achieving high and equitable coverage of life-saving vaccines, the availability of sustainable, equitable, and predictable financing for vaccine delivery is essential. Over the last two decades, …

Kimberly Mihayo

Research Officer

Harvard University recent graduate Kimberly Mihayo holds a degree in History of Science she obtained in 2015, and her coursework focused on global health and health policy. She has a diverse experience in areas of global health, and is passionate about studying the biological, epidemiological, historical and social determinants of infectious diseases.

Kimberly’s interest in global health began in 2013 when she spent time interning at a HIV & TB hospital in Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa, as part of a Harvard undergraduate research fellowship. Here, she developed insights on the intersection between social behaviors and the spread of infectious diseases in society. Her coursework in global health allowed her to supplement her experience in the field, with a framework for understanding health, and the spread of diseases.

Currently, she is working on a Vectorworks funded project, seeking to understand the drivers and magnitude of residual malaria transmission in Zanzibar. The study is designed to investigate residual malaria from an entomological and human behavioral lens, in order to understand how residual transmission occurs. Kimberly will be involved in both (entomology & human behavioral) components of the study, and will work closely with the study team to support the development, implementation and completion of the study in Zanzibar

Projects

Investigating the magnitude and drivers of residual malaria transmission in Zanzibar

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