Kimberly Mihayo

In the News

Ifakara scientist explains why ending Tuberculosis requires better diagnostics

Ending tuberculosis through better diagnostics Author: Dr. Frederick Haraka, MD Yes, to end tuberculosis (TB), we need better diagnostic tools! TB is among the deadliest diseases in the world. In …

Study: 12% of people living with HIV in rural Tanzania have hypertension

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (March 9, 2017). IHI Research Scientist Dr Kim Mwamelo presents findings of the study in Boston, US, last year at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic …

Recent Projects

Assessing the progress towards rabies elimination from Pemba Island, Tanzania

Rabies is a deadly disease endemic in dog populations across Africa. Although rabies can be eliminated through mass dog vaccination, there has been little investment in dog vaccination in Africa …

Engaging pastoralists in controlling malaria mosquitoes in their communities

The project is aimed at applying pastoralists’ knowledge to find water bodies during the dry season and accurately identify aquatic habitats that can be treated with larvicide pyriproxyfen (PPF) to …

Kimberly Mihayo

Research Officer

Harvard University recent graduate Kimberly Mihayo holds a degree in History of Science she obtained in 2015, and her coursework focused on global health and health policy. She has a diverse experience in areas of global health, and is passionate about studying the biological, epidemiological, historical and social determinants of infectious diseases.

Kimberly’s interest in global health began in 2013 when she spent time interning at a HIV & TB hospital in Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa, as part of a Harvard undergraduate research fellowship. Here, she developed insights on the intersection between social behaviors and the spread of infectious diseases in society. Her coursework in global health allowed her to supplement her experience in the field, with a framework for understanding health, and the spread of diseases.

Currently, she is working on a Vectorworks funded project, seeking to understand the drivers and magnitude of residual malaria transmission in Zanzibar. The study is designed to investigate residual malaria from an entomological and human behavioral lens, in order to understand how residual transmission occurs. Kimberly will be involved in both (entomology & human behavioral) components of the study, and will work closely with the study team to support the development, implementation and completion of the study in Zanzibar

Projects

Investigating the magnitude and drivers of residual malaria transmission in Zanzibar

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