× Home Projects Partners FAQs Contacts
ihi-logo

REPORT: Survey combining malaria prevalence and nutrition indicators covering 184 Tanzania districts

May 23, 2022
REPORT: Survey combining malaria prevalence and nutrition indicators covering 184 Tanzania districts
A snip from the report's cover page.

Since 2014/15, the Ministry of Health in Tanzania, through the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP), has been conducting school malaria surveys to document prevalence. However, in 2019 a nutrition component was added to broaden the spectrum of assessment of health indicators.

Key highlights of the 2019 School Malaria and Nutrition Survey (SMNS) Report are:

  1. The SMNS was conducted between August and October 2019 to evaluate the prevalence of malaria and malnutrition among public primary school pupils in Tanzania.
  2. The survey is the third study in a series of School Malaria Parasitemia Surveys (SMPS) conducted in Tanzania biennially from 2014/2015 until 2019 when the MoHCDGEC decided to broaden the spectrum of assessment of health indicators by adding a nutrition component among pupils.
  3. The survey was done on 68,147 primary school pupils aged between 5 and 19 years and covered all councils (184) in Tanzania.
  4. Malaria and malnutrition still pose numerous challenges to health status and socioeconomic welfare, particularly in low and middle-income countries, including Tanzania.
  5. Prevalence levels of malaria infection vary highly between regions and subregions with Southern and Northern regions carrying the most burden.
  6. There are high levels of knowledge among pupils and household members on core and effective malaria intervention, such as the use of mosquito nets – with a high proportion of households protected with LLINs.
  7. Prevalence of anaemia is high among young boys and girls and among late adolescents.
  8. Co-existence of malaria and anaemia was observed, indicating that strategies employed to curb malaria should go hand-in-hand.
  9. Overweight and obesity is low among pupils aged between 5 and 19 years and higher in urban areas than rural, with most overweight pupils observed in the Dar es Salaam Region.
  10. Dietary diversity at both the household and individual levels is below the minimum average.
  11. 42.0% of school children and adolescents surveyed are physically inactive.
  12. Future investments in malaria control interventions and nutritional services in Tanzania are highly recommended.

We bring the full report of the SMNS study here..